Asbestos

Asbestos is a mineral that is highly hazardous to handle. The removal and treatment of asbestos-containing materials (ACM) is a regulated process in many countries around the world. Since its use has not been completely banned in some countries, asbestos-containing materials may be found in buildings of all ages, including recently constructed structures. Asbestos is often associated with “older” buildings, is commonly disturbed and released during demolition and sanding, and is frequently found in mortar, drywall joint compound, older vinyl flooring, vinyl tiles, and their adhesives, ceiling tiles, and other finishes typically encountered during crime scene cleanup activities.

While there are few specific federal, state, territorial, and local regulations and guidelines directly related to the cleanup of biological and infectious injury scene hazardous materials, there are general safety and health guidelines applicable to businesses that perform such work. Asbestos-containing materials (ACM) that have been contaminated with blood or OPIM will be removed and disposed of in accordance with local, state, territorial, or federal asbestos regulations, which take precedence over bloodborne microbe removal guidelines.

For Northern American professionals, OSHA 1910.1030 (b) Bloodborne Pathogens should be recognized. According to 1910.1030(d)(4)(iii)(C), the removal of all regulated waste should comply with the relevant regulations of the U.S., states, territories, and political subdivisions of states and territories. Professionals should be aware that contaminated ACM, if disposed of as biohazard waste for incineration, can make the ACM friable and therefore pose a greater risk than if disposed of in landfills.

Experts should be aware that contaminated ACM, if disposed of as biohazard waste for incineration, can make the ACM friable and therefore pose a greater risk than if disposed of in landfills. Even if the building owner has conducted an asbestos survey, the remediation contractor is still responsible for identifying and controlling asbestos exposure during demolition and removal of materials.

If workers encounter materials contaminated with blood or OPIM containing asbestos or materials that are known or suspected to contain asbestos that may be disturbed during work activities, they should cease activities that could cause the material to become friable or airborne. A competent (and, if necessary, licensed) asbestos abatement contractor should be engaged to perform the asbestos abatement.

100%

100% Eco-Friendly Chemicals

100%

100% Customer Satisfaction Guarantee 

100%

Fully Insured Public Liability and Workers Compensation

Let’s chat

to discuss how we can be the best partner for you.

  • 02 6361 8447

  • talktous@mcardles.com.au